My top 5 Biophilic designs in Vietnam

Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)

Architects all over the world are discovering biophilic design and incorporating it into their buildings. 

Historically plants and greenery were the discipline of landscapers and interior designers, but more and more architects are incorporating greenery into the framework of their structures.

The reasons for this are many, amongst them are that biophilic design provides both physical and mental wellbeing benefits such as improve stress levels, cleaner air, regulating our circadian rhythm and reducing blood pressure. As urban spaces develop and cities become larger and more densely populated, architects and designers are having to think of new ways to incorporate nature into our lives and workspaces. By incorporating plants and nature into architectural spaces this helps to offset the disappearing green spaces and the green spaces that are already overused.

An excellent example of this can be seen in Vietnam. Vietnamese Architects and designers are experiencing a boom in Biophilic design and are developing new links with nature through incorporating plant life and elements of nature into projects of all sizes and dimensions.

Here is my selection of the top 5 biophilic designs in Vietnam.

Lets start with the Angarden Café by Le House, Hanoi

Designed by architect firmLe House, An’garden Cafe was inspired by the hanging gardens of Babylon. What began as a former industrial site, this cafe is now home to plants, vines, trees, koi pools, and is an abundance of nature light and space.

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki
An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

 

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki
An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

The interior of Angarden is formed from steel frames and bare bricks filled with lush greenery including trees that sprout from the concrete floor. Adding intrigue and the experience of a jungle floor, there is a hidden koi pond that is discretely located behind the blackened steel staircase. This space is three stories high and features a timber – slated roof that overlaps with a massive glass façade allowing natural light to shine through this open space. There are also extensive timber planters suspended from the roof stocked with lush tropical vines, creating a canopy of green.

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki
An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

 

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

 

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

 

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

 

An’garden Café Designed by  Le House. Image Credit - © Hiroyuki Oki

 

The Hut by 23o5 Studio, Ho Chi Minh City

This amazing design by23o5 Studio, broke boundaries, by bringing the outdoors into the bedroom via a garden and breaking up its concrete interiors with splashes of greenery. They have managed to blur the barriers between the inside and outside through using iron shelves that separate both the back garden and living area. Also, when constructing this home, they have incorporated openings into the roof to allow for natural light to filter down onto the plant- filled spaces below.

The Hut by 23o5 Studio

 

 The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki 
The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki
The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki 

 

The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki
The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki 

The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki

The Hut by 23o5 Studio Image Credit - hiroyuki oki 

 Tropical Forest Caféand Plant Store by Tayone Design Studio, Hanoi

This beautiful space was turned into a tropical oasis of plant life in the heart of the bustling city of Hanoi. The Tropical Forest Café reduces pollution and sells succulents to the local community.  This design by Tayone Design Studio, created a real-life tropical forest based in the heart of the city which provides fresh clean air to help drive out the dust and pollution.

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio
Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

 The roof of the café is formed from pitched wood and glass to emulate the formation of a greenhouse, whilst helping to filter out pollution in the space below. Plant climbers reach along the walls while vines flow down from the ceiling, creating a lush botanical effect.

 

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

Tropical Forest café and plant store by Tayone Design Studio

 

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects, Hoi An

Flowing greenery covers the sides of the Hoi An Hotel, that has concrete planters concealed within the structure of the sandstone walls. The plants offer two purposes, the first one is providing shading for the corridors from the sun and the second one is it allow guest to have that extra privacy behind a natural forest curtain.

 

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)

The Greenery continues inside the hotel, where architectVo Trong Nghia , renowned for his biophilic buildings, has created a restaurant with hanging planters throughout the space.

 

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)

Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)
Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)
Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)
Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)
Hoi An Hotel by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Image Credit)

Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects, Ho Chi Minh City

 

Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki

This design is part ofVo Trong NghiasHouse for Treesseries. The aim for this series was to be able to return greenery to cities. The concrete box structure that forms this home has plants emerging from every available space. Its infinite gardens connect the homes with multi-generation inhabitants while improving the wellbeing of the people who are fortunate enough to live here; also, residents gather fresh produce for the kitchen that growns in the gardens.

 

Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki

 

Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects Image Credit -  Hiroyuki Oki

So, that was the roundup of my five favourite biophilic designs of Vietnam. Be sureto join me next week when I will be sharing my tips on how to create an anxiety reducing biophilic living space.